10 Best New Balance Stability Running Shoes

Updated on: October 2021

Best New Balance Stability Running Shoes in 2021


New Balance Women's Vongo V4 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, Light Aluminum/White, 8 B US

New Balance Women's Vongo V4 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, Light Aluminum/White, 8 B US
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • Innovative support: the New Balance fresh Foam vongo running shoes feature a design built on runners' Data. Featuring a bootie construction and molded sockliner, these shoes keep your foot in place and in comfort
  • Fresh Foam midsole: crafted for performance and all-day comfort, these athletic Shoes feature fresh Foam midsole cushioning that is precision engineered to deliver an ultra-cushioned, lightweight ride
  • Durable outsole: The rubber sole on these cushioned running shoes is dual-density for a smooth, supportive ride. The outsole has been designed to work seamlessly with the midsole and heel to deliver consistent support for those with mild pronation
  • 3D screen-printed upper: the lightweight upper made from breathable air mesh features a strategic 3D screen-printed midfoot cage that provides a better fit and midfoot wrap, offering more support
  • 4mm drop: these stability running shoes feature a heel-to-toe drop of approximately 4mm. Due to variances created during development and manufacturing processes, references to 4mm are approximate

New Balance Women's 1540v3 Running Shoe, Gunmetal/Dragonfly, 8 M US

New Balance Women's 1540v3 Running Shoe, Gunmetal/Dragonfly, 8 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • ENCAP midsole technology provides support and maximum durability
  • Manufactured in the US for over 75 years and representing a limited portion of our US sales
  • ROLLBAR with Medial & Lateral TPU Posts for ultimate motion control
  • Synthetic/mesh upper

New Balance Women's 680v6 Cushioning Running Shoe, Light Slate/Stone Blue/Bali Blue, 9 B US

New Balance Women's 680v6 Cushioning Running Shoe, Light Slate/Stone Blue/Bali Blue, 9 B US
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Mesh
  • Mesh

New Balance Men's 1080v9 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, Gunmetal/Outerspace/Energy red, 9 D US

New Balance Men's 1080v9 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, Gunmetal/Outerspace/Energy red, 9 D US
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Ultra Heel and Bootie Construction
  • Engineered Mesh with No-Sew material application
  • Fresh Foam
  • 8 MM Drop
  • Ortholite Sockliner

New Balance Women's 1080v9 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, air/Vintage Indigo, 9.5 M US

New Balance Women's 1080v9 Fresh Foam Running Shoe, air/Vintage Indigo, 9.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Ultra Heel and Bootie Construction
  • Engineered Mesh with No-Sew material application
  • Fresh Foam
  • 8 MM Drop
  • Ortholite Sockliner

New Balance Men's 520v5 Cushioning Running Shoe, Castlerock/Energy red/Black, 10.5 4E US

New Balance Men's 520v5 Cushioning Running Shoe, Castlerock/Energy red/Black, 10.5 4E US
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Injection Molded EVA
  • Data Inspired Upper Design
  • Rubber Outsole
  • NB Response 1.0 Performance Insert
  • Synthetic/Mesh Upper with Comfort Collar

New Balance Men's M990GL4 Running Shoe, Grey/Castle Rock, 11 D US

New Balance Men's M990GL4 Running Shoe, Grey/Castle Rock, 11 D US
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Lace up running shoe featuring breathable mesh upper with supportive leather overlays
  • Blown rubber outsole; Dual density collar foam
  • ENCAP PU ring with EVA core in heel
  • ENCAP PU Ring with EVA Core
  • Medicare/HSPCS Code = PDAC A5500 Diabetic Shoes

New Balance Women's WW496V3 CUSH +, Reflection/Bleached Sunrise/deep Porcelain Blue, 10 B US

New Balance Women's WW496V3 CUSH +, Reflection/Bleached Sunrise/deep Porcelain Blue, 10 B US
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Array

New Balance Women's 940v4 Running Shoe, Black/Magnet, 8 D US

New Balance Women's 940v4 Running Shoe, Black/Magnet, 8 D US
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • 12 mm drop; due to variances created during the development and manufacturing processes, all references to 12 mm drop are approximate
  • ABZORB midsole absorbs impact through a combination of cushioning and compression resistance
  • Dual density post offers added stability
  • Synthetic/Mesh Upper

New Balance Men's M870BW5 Running Shoe, Black/White, 13 D US

New Balance Men's M870BW5 Running Shoe, Black/White, 13 D US
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Surface recommendation as firm ground and a low top height
  • Not Water Resistant and a synthetic fabric

Cesarean Sections: The Easy Way Out?

Are moms turning a life-saving surgical procedure into a convenient "out"? Or perhaps the medical community is running scared, needing to keep the malpractice suits away? Find out just where the line is being drawn.

Cesarean section, as defined by American Heritage Science Dictionary: A surgical incision through the abdominal wall and uterus, performed to deliver a fetus. According to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG), there are many reasons why a woman would need to deliver her child by cesarean section. If a woman is carrying more than one child, it may be necessary if the babies are being born too early or are in unfavorable positions for a natural birth. If a woman's labor is not progressing, if her blood pressure is too high, or if fetal heart monitors pick up on baby's distress, these may medically warrant a cesarean section being performed.

There is also a condition known as placenta previa, where the placenta is blocking the cervix, preventing the baby from exiting the uterus. Placental abruption is another dangerous condition where the placenta separates and cuts off the baby's oxygen supply, requiring immediate delivery. Other reasons include baby's size, being breech, and some maternal infections, such as HIV.

Of course, after the first c-section, it is likely another will be performed, as it is currently viewed as the safest way to deliver after a previous c-section. There are, however, mothers who opt for VBAC, or Vaginal Birth After Cesarean. For many mothers, this has been a very safe and successful method after a c-section (60-80% of mothers who attempt it are successful), yet many doctors and hospitals refuse to allow this method of childbirth to be attempted. Why? It can of course be quite risky, especially in cases of mothers who had placental problems in past pregnancies, women with high vertical incisions, and the risk of uterine rupture is real (though rare). So why are doctors and hospitals opting to not even take it on? For the hospitals equipped to perform an emergency cesarean and choosing not to allow VBAC, what message does this send to pregnant women?

For the doctors, the risk of a malpractice lawsuit is very real. While the U.S. continues to debate the current laws of negligent torts (malpractice lawsuits), the truth is that some physicians are practicing what is known as defensive medicine. By performing procedures having little or no medical benefit to a patient, but keep them safe from a lawsuit, one can imagine the increase in patient's insurance costs, but also something even more serious for the practicing physician. Loss of confidence and self-respect. One would think that a doctor who is too scared of a malpractice suit would be more inclined to perform a procedure purely at a patient's request, rather than for medically necessary reasons.

Regardless of the reason, are patient requested cesarean sections truly a danger to woman and infant? A recent conference of the ACOG decided to address the rising c-section rates and the controversy surrounding what they are calling "cesarean delivery upon maternal request" (CDMR). The worry is that some mothers are scheduling a c-section for the ease of knowing when they will deliver, having a sitter ready for other children at home, ready to walk into the hospital. Opinions aside, is this a safe way to go?

According to Dr. Mary D'Alton, director of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center, the data is well, inconclusive. "There just isn't sufficient evidence at this time to fully evaluate the benefits and risks of cesarean delivery based on maternal request compared to normal vaginal delivery. "There was consensus, says Dr. D'Alton, that CDMR is not recommended for women who are planning on having several children since the risks of placenta previa and placenta accrete increase with each cesarean delivery."

Fredric D. Frigoletto Jr, MD, associate chief of staff and vice chair at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, says, "At this time, the best delivery mode for any woman is best decided by her and her physician, considering her individual circumstances. A woman must be thoroughly and accurately informed about the risks and benefits of each option for her as she participates in the decision," The ACOG still maintains however, that cesareans should be performed for medical reasons.

Confused? While there is no "hard evidence" that CDMR is harmful, there are some things to consider. Trained medical professionals advise cesarean sections for medical reasons only. Women who "choose" such a procedure, should be aware of the possible risks involved in what still is a serious surgical procedure. Physicians need to educate their patient of all the risks involved in the chosen childbirth method, while not being "bullied" into performing a procedure that may not be necessary. While the truth is that no childbirth is an easy way out, a great physician-patient relationship can help to ensure a safe and healthy delivery of both mother and child. Statistics aside, that is the desired outcome.

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